We recently moved and for about three months now we have used a new Cable Television service called Comcast. Many of you already use it, but those of you who do not, can’t understand what a difference it makes in your everyday life.

Cable is cable right? It’s not the case and believe me, I feel like I’m a professional mover sometimes because we have moved 14 times in 18 years. My job is interesting, and it requires that I move to different parts of the country frequently enough that things like Cable are a line item for me.

The Internet has been a large part of what I do for about 13 of those 18 years. So I like to get a bundle package if I can because work will pay for my cable television that way :) With Comcast not only can I get the Cable and the Internet but I got unlimited phone service too. It’s a package called Triple Play and it’s really a great deal.

They have many tiers so you can pick the triple play package that makes sense to you (with or without premium content, etc..).

The installation was easy, the guy came out and took care of everything. He went through all of my equipment and made sure everything worked the right way before he left.

My package called for 15-18 megabit down and 3 up. So when I did a speed test and saw that I was getting 27 down and 4 up I was pretty happy although in the back of my mind I was thinking “This is a burst speed it will go down later when I start downloading or after a week or so”.

I was wrong. I’ve been downloading at 2.6 – 2.9 MEGABYTES per second sustained for 3 months. Obviously I’m not doing that 24/7 but I have downloaded movies, music, and everything else people like to download during that time along with some not too small files from work. I have not seen a speed less than 2.4 MEGABYTES per second.

Network latency is a big deal as well. If you like to play online games your “PING TIME” which is latency matters. It is the time it takes for a packet of data to leave your computer, get to its destination and return with a response. A decent latency is about 80 milliseconds in a game. It’s actually what I used to average using Time Warner to my favorite game. The lower the number the faster your ability to respond in your game will be. It gives you a distinct advantage and without it, you are just one of the many noobs looking to get harvested by the elite. Pwned if you will. You can imagine my elation to see 42 millisecond ping times to my favorite game.

Because of Comcast many noobs have fallen in battle ;)

The phone service is something I haven’t really had a good look at. I use my cellphone most of the time so I’m going to have to get back to you on call quality. To be honest we don’t actually own a real phone to plug into it and I haven’t had time to go out and grab one at a store.

On the Cable Television side things couldn’t be better. We have all the movie channels and ON DEMAND has made the movie channels worth watching because you can see the content on your schedule. The reason we never got them before is we never had the time to sit down and watch the movies we wanted to on THEIR SCHEDULE. It’s great to do it on ours. You just click the on demand button on the remote control and select what you want to see from the menu. It’s that simple.

Another big thing that is new from Comcast is 3D television. If you own a 3D television you can go into the ON DEMAND menu and select 3D content to view. They have quite a large number of free things to see and a good selection of stuff you pay to view. Definitely a lot of fun and saves you a trip to the video store.

So far I really have to say I am impressed with Comcast. I’ll keep you posted every 3 months to tell you how things are going and circle back on call quality with the VOIP phone solution they have.

Philip Ferreira has been contributing to Reviewboard Magazine for over 16 years. He is the founder of this publication. While his health has kept him from running Reviewboard Magazine he still manages to write articles when he is feeling up to it. He holds 38 computer certifications, programs in 9 languages, and is a self-taught chef. His interests include robotics, electric vehicles, programming, home theater, and anything remotely related to technology.

Philip Ferreira